Get (the sheep) off the fence!


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How to get sheep or cattle away from a fence or hedge.

Getting stubborn sheep away from a fence or hedge during the early stages of training can be very frustrating unless you know the "tricks of the trade".

This tutorial shows you not only how to prise the sheep away from the fence, but also how to turn the dog's determination to circle the sheep into a useful tool for moving the sheep in the open field.

Once your dog masters this, it'll very soon be able to keep the sheep out in the open.

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Eve at the Pen


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A complete training session, teaching the dog good pen manners.

Getting sheep into a tight spot, and then getting them out again, needs confidence and control. In this tutorial we see Eve, a keen young dog who's basic training is in place, but Eve still shows some tyro weaknesses - she favours "Away" to "Come Bye", for instance, and her stop isn't 100% reliable (yet).

However, a lesson in and around the pen doesn't only teach penning, it gives us the opportunity to work on Eve's stop and flanks, to introduce the "Look Back" (when she fails to bring all her sheep cleanly to the pen) and to help build her confidence to get between the sheep and the fence.

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Backwards is the way forward


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Our most useful exercise once you have control of the dog

It's boring - and it might appear pointless to the novice, but walking backwards with the dog bringing the sheep up to you is the single most important exercise you can do once your dog has basic control of the sheep.

It improves pace, working distance, the stop, sheep control, and much more.

As well as clearly demonstrating how to get a strong dog to bring the sheep up quietly - this tutorial provides a valuable tip on how to read your sheep.

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Inside Flanks (Circle on Command) (Parts 1 & 2)


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A valuable exercise for increasing control of your dog

Dramatically improve your sheepdog or cattle dog's work with this important two-part tutorial.

Even if the dog's already competent at driving, teaching inside flanks or circling on command will not necessarily be easy.

Once the dog can do it, the dog's confidence and control over the stock will grow considerably.

In part one of this tutorial, Andy demonstrates how he uses tricks, commands, encouragement and lots of excitement, to teach the dog its inside flanks and to circle the sheep in front of him in the open field, and in part two, he shows how the training ring can make training inside flanks far easier.

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Learn Your Commands


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Confusing your commands is very bad practice

Attempting to train a sheep or cattle dog when you're not fully conversant with the commands can cause serious problems.

It's completely unfair on the dog because you'll be blaming it for going the wrong way when in fact it was doing exactly what you asked.

Training a dog to work stock can be confusing enough, without you adding to the chaos by talking rubbish. This tutorial will give you some tips to make learning your commands easier.

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The Dog’s Confidence


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The dog's confidence is vitally important

Understanding the factors which affect the dog's work is extremely important for a successful sheep or cattle dog trainer.

Of those factors, the dog's confidence is probably the most underestimated.

Confidence is of vital importance if a sheepdog is to work efficiently, especially at long distances from the handler, between the stock and a fence, or when faced by stubborn animals.

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My Dog’s No Good


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The dog's not 'no good', it just needs training

If someone tells you your dog's no good, don't believe them.

As long as your dog has the herding instinct, the will to work for its handler, and is physically fit, it's capable of learning how to work stock.

All too often, farmers, shepherds and handlers assume that a dog's useless because it happens to be working badly, when in fact it's their fault for not showing the dog how they want it to work.

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Starting a Young Puppy (Parts 1 & 2)


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How to start training a young puppy to work sheep and other livestock

We take two eleven week old puppies to sheep

Part 1. The usual age for starting a pup on sheep is between six and twelve months, but if you have the right sort of sheep and know what you're doing, you can start a pup at a much younger age. Starting a dog early makes it much easier to get the youngster under control in the presence of sheep.

In "Starting a Young Puppy" Andy shows what to do and what to avoid when he takes litter-mates Ezra and Carew to the sheep at just eleven week old.

In Part 2, we take young Ezra to the sheep again, but this time, give him a little more guidance and lots of encouragement.

We also see signs of Ezra's confidence growing and learn that nine sheep is too many for this early stage of a dog's training.

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