My Dog’s No Good

Full membership required, to view sheepdog training videos - Signup - LOGIN
Thumbnail image for the sheep and cattle dog training tutorial: My Dog's No Good

If someone tells you your dog's no good, don't believe them.

As long as your dog has the herding instinct, the will to work for its handler, and is physically fit, it's capable of learning how to work stock.

All too often, farmers, shepherds and handlers assume that a dog's useless because it happens to be working badly, when in fact it's their fault for not showing the dog how they want it to work.

"WATCH NEXT" SUGGESTIONS

No Excuses Please! Backwards is the Way Forward! Back to Forwards!

Moving Out – Into the Open Field

Full membership required, to view sheepdog training videos - Signup - LOGIN
Thumbnail image for the sheep and cattle dog training tutorial: Moving Out Into the Open Field

Getting your trainee sheepdog to bring the sheep out of the training ring without crisis can be a tricky affair.

The sheep will usually grasp the slightest opportunity to bolt and this can result in an ugly chase.

In this tutorial you'll learn a simple routine which will greatly increase the chances of a smooth transition with the dog maintaining control of the sheep from inside the training ring to the open field.

"WATCH NEXT" SUGGESTIONS

Training Max the GRIPPER Educating Gloria The Training Stick

Starting a Strong Dog

Full membership required, to view sheepdog training videos - Signup - LOGIN
Thumbnail image for the sheep and cattle dog training tutorial: Starting a Strong Dog

In part one of Starting a Young Puppy, we saw that with care, it's possible to begin a puppy's training at a very early age, but if you didn't have the luxury of well-dogged docile sheep for your puppy to learn with, then you've had to wait before you can start training - and you may find you have a tougher dog than you bargained for when it comes to training it on sheep.

Rather like Tess in this tutorial, there's a good chance your young dog will have its own ideas about how to go about tackling sheep!

"WATCH NEXT" SUGGESTIONS

Training Max - the GRIPPER! Balance (What's the Point) Get off the Fence!

Outrun (Part 2)

Full membership required, to view sheepdog training videos - Signup - LOGIN
Thumbnail image for the sheep and cattle dog training tutorial: The Outrun part two

The outrun marks the difference between a dog in training and a dog in work. When you no longer need to walk to your sheep, but can send the dog away to gather and bring them to you, you'll have a real sense of achievement - and a really useful sheepdog.

In The Outrun part 2, Andy demonstrates how positioning yourself, your dog and the sheep, in relation to each other, is the key to success when you're working on lengthening or widening your dog's outrun. To prove the method works we see Carew at an early stage in her career - when she'd "cross over" at the prospect of even quite a short outrun - and, just a few months later, tackling a 500 metre outrun for the first time.

"WATCH NEXT" SUGGESTIONS

The Outrun 3 Driving (Parts 1 - 2 - 3)

Shedding (or Separating) The Sheep

Full membership required, to view sheepdog training videos - Signup - LOGIN
Thumbnail image for the sheep and cattle dog training tutorial: Shedding

Shedding is one of those operations that contradicts the basic rules we've taught the dog so far. Previously, we've insisted the dog keeps the sheep together, but to shed them, we must teach the dog to part them again.

Many dogs take readily to shedding, but it's understandable if a young dog's confused or worried by it.

As with most sheepdog training, the key to success is to make the task as easy as possible when we start.

This tutorial shows how to teach a dog to shed sheep by making it as easy as possible for the dog to come through them. Featuring footage from actual training sessions this tutorial has a running commentary throughout.

"WATCH NEXT" SUGGESTIONS

The Outrun 1 The Outrun 2 The Outrun 3

Calm but Firm

Full membership required, to view sheepdog training videos - Signup - LOGIN
Thumbnail image for the sheep and cattle dog training tutorial: Calm But Firm

A dog which is aggressive with the sheep, but runs away as soon as the trainer attempts to correct it, is among the most difficult dogs to train.

Audrey not only fits this description perfectly, but just for good measure, refuses to go "Away" around the sheep too.

The Calm but Firm tutorial will show you how to cope with these difficult dogs. Featuring footage from actual training sessions.

"WATCH NEXT" SUGGESTIONS

Sticky Dogs! (Eye) The Dog's Confidence How Often, and for How Long?

Close Work 2 – In and Out of the Yard

Full membership required, to view sheepdog training videos - Signup - LOGIN
Thumbnail image for the sheep and cattle dog training tutorial: Close Work 2 - In and Out of the Yard

In this follow-up to Close Work part one, Carew and Tess are each required to bring a small bunch of sheep into and out of the yard.

The task is more challenging for the pair than you'd expect because our dogs live in the yard, and they certainly make their presence felt when the sheep reach the gateway.

Andy gives a detailed explanation of what's happening as Carew and Tess both find the work quite difficult.

"WATCH NEXT" SUGGESTIONS

Shedding The Outrun 1 The Outrun 2

Driving (Parts 1 – 3)

Full membership required, to view sheepdog training videos - Signup - LOGIN
Thumbnail image for the sheep and cattle dog training tutorial: Driving part one

THREE TUTORIALS to help you teach your dog to drive

PART 1.
Some sheepdog trainers dread teaching their dog to drive and it's understandable, because when we ask a dog to take the sheep or cattle away, it's contrary to the dog's instinct. If you understand what's going on though, it becomes much simpler, and more enjoyable for dog and trainer. In this tutorial you'll discover how to ease the dog into driving and reduce the stress involved when we ask the dog to take the stock away.

PART 2.
Following on from the first sheepdog driving tutorial, in this video, you will learn how to use your body position to maintain some control over the dog while it learns to drive. Just as when controlling the direction that the dog flanks around the sheep in the early stages of training, body position and point of balance are also crucial for controlling direction when teaching the drive. In this tutorial, Andy shows that putting himself in the right place at the right time, can make a huge difference to the behaviour of the dog.

PART 3.
Unashamed deception! Calling the dog back onto line when it's determined to hook the sheep back to you can be difficult and frustrating. As it drives the sheep away from the handler, the trainee dog is often so keen to get ahead of them and bring them back that it will ignore conventional flanking commands. In this tutorial, Andy uses what might be deemed an inappropriate command to call the dog back onto line and keep the sheep moving in the right direction.